HIS 260: HISTORICAL REACTIONS TO

CRIMINAL AND DEVIANT BEHAVIOUR


North Island College Fall 2016

Meeting Times T, Th 10:00 - 11:20 am

Meeting Place:  Komoux 104

Instructor:  Dan Hinman-Smith

Office:  Village G6 

Office Hours:  Mon. 11:30 am - 1:00 pm; Thurs. 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm (or by appointment)

Office Phone: 250-334-5000, Extension 4024

Home Phone:   250-336-0238

Web-Site: http://www.misterdann.com/

E-Mail: dan.hinmansmith@nic.bc.ca


Course Description

Once upon a time, a shipwrecked sailor washed up upon distant shores.  He wondered about where he was.  Then he saw a scaffold and gallows.  "Thank God," he exhaled, "I am in a civilized country."  What is the relationship between civilization, crime and punishment?  Why have dead bodies been the symbol of law at some times and places but not at others?  Why did criminal trials begin?  How can we account for the replacement of torture and the "bloody scaffold" with the rise of the penitentiary?  This course will ask such questions as it provides an historical perspective on changing definitions of deviancy, societal reactions to violent or criminal activity, and public policies to counteract prohibited behaviour.  The time span and geographical range will be vast; we will range from the Mesopotamia of 3,000 BCE to 21st-century North America.  To provide focus, the curriculum will focus upon Crime and Punishment in the Ancient Mediterranean World; in Early Modern and Modern Europe and England; and in Modern North America.


Tentative Class Schedule

Week 1

Thursday, September 8

a)  Course Introduction


Week 2

Tuesday, September 13

a)  Discussion: Hammurabi's Code Of Laws

b)  Video:  "The House I Live In" (2012) [108 mins.]

Reading Assignment:

Hammurabi's Code Of Laws

John H. Arnold, "Chapter 1: Questions About Murder And History, " History: A Very Short Introduction (New York: Oxford, 2000): 1-14.

Thursday, September 15

a)  Introduce Historic Trials Assignment

b)  Finish Video:  "The House I Live In" (2012) [108 mins.]


Week 3

Tuesday, September 20

a)  Discussion: "The First Murder: Cain And Abel"

b)  Lecture: Draconian Measures And The Wisdom Of Solon -- Crime And Punishment In Ancient Greece

Reading Assignment:

Bill Moyers, "The First Murder: Cain And Abel," Genesis: A Living Conversation (New York: Anchor, 1997)

Optional Viewing Assignment:

"The First Murder: Cain And Abel," Genesis With Bill Moyers, PBS (1996).

Thursday, September 22

a)  Finish Lecture: Draconian Measures And The Wisdom Of Solon -- Crime And Punishment In Ancient Greece

b)  Lecture: Crime And Punishment In Ancient Rome

Reading Assignment:

Twelve Tables, 451-450 BCE

Lionel Casson, "Imagine, If You Will, A Time Without Any Lawyers At All," Smithsonian (October 1987): 122-131.

Optional Reading Assignment:

Criminal Procedure In Ancient Greece And The Trial Of Socrates:

An Introduction To The Athenian Legal System:


Week 4

Tuesday, September 27

a)  Mini-Lecture: Crime And Punishment In The Abrahamic Tradition

b)  Discussion: "Letter From A Birmingham Jail"

c)  Video: "The Trial Of Jesus," History Channel (50 mins.) or "Criminal History: Ancient Rome," History Channel (2010, 45 mins.)

Reading Assignment:

Martin Luther King, Jr., "Letter From A Birmingham Jail," (1963).

Thursday, September 29

a)  Discussion:  Return Of Martin Guerre

b)  Introduce Angelique And Burning Of Montreal Assignment

Reading Assignment:

Natalie Zemon Davis, Return Of Martin Guerre (Cambridge: Harvard, 1984).

Optional Viewing Assignment:

"The Return Of Martin Guerre," 1982 (122 mins.)


Week 5

Tuesday, October 4

a)  Video:  "The Outlaw," Episode 7, Medieval Lives, BBC

b)  Discussion: The Outlaw As Folk Hero

c)  Lecture:  The Outlaw As Folk Hero

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Outlaw As Folk Hero Discussion Topic.

Thursday, October 6

a)  Lecture:  The Outlaw As Folk Hero  (II)

b)  Possible Video Clip:  "Bonnie And Clyde: 'Til Death Do Us Part, American Experience, PBS


Week 6

Tuesday, October 11

a)  ***Student Mini-Presentations: The Trials Of History (I)

Thursday, October 13

a)  Discussion:  Is Eating People Wrong?

Reading Assignment:

Allan C. Hutchinson, Is Eating People Wrong?: Great Legal Cases And How They Shaped The World (New York: Cambridge, 2011).


Week 7

Tuesday, October 18

a)  ***Student Mini-Presentations: The Trials Of History (II)

Thursday, October 20

a)  Video: "Garrow's Law, Episode 1" [2009, 60 minutes]

Viewing Assignment:

  "Highwaymen," Episode 1, Britain's Outlaws: Highwaymen, Pirates And Rogues, BBC, 2015.

"Rogues Gallery," Episode 3, Britain's Outlaws: Highwaymen, Pirates And Rogues, BBC, 2015.


Week 8

Tuesday, October 25

a)  Albion's Fatal Tree: Crime And Punishment In Early Modern And Modern England (I)

***Trials Of History Assignment Due***

Thursday, October 27

a)  Discussion: Old Bailey

b)  Albion's Fatal Tree: Crime And Punishment In Early Modern And Modern England (II)

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Old Bailey Discussion Topic.


Week 9

Tuesday, November 1

a)  Discussion: William Garrow and Strange Case Of The Law

b)  Video: "Voyage Of The Courtesans" (Secrets Of The Dead) [2005, 60 minutes]

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in William Garrow And The Rise Of The Defense Attorney Discussion Topic.

Optional Viewing Assignment (I recommend watching at least one episode from this three-hour documentary series)

  "Laying Down The Law," Episode 1, The Strange Case Of The Law, BBC, 2013.

"The Pursuit Of Liberty," Episode 2, The Strange Case Of The Law, BBC, 2013.

"Presumed Innocent," Episode 3, The Strange Case Of The Law, BBC, 2013.

Thursday, November 3

a)  History Workshop: Angelique And The Burning Of Montreal

Reading Assignment:

  Research extensively in Torture And The Truth: Angelique And The Burning Of Montreal.

For a description of the assignment itself, see my Angelique And The Burning Of Montreal page.


Week 10

Tuesday, November 8

a)  Lecture:  A Commonwealth Of Thieves -- Australia As A Convict Republic

Thursday, November 10

a)  Discussion:  Cesare Beccaria And Enlightenment Ideas Of Justice

b)  Mini-Lecture: Discipline And Punish -- Criminology And The Social Theories Of Michel Foucault

Reading Assignment:

Cesare Beccaria, An Essay On Crimes And Punishments (1764).

Roger-Pol Droit, "Michel Foucault, On The Role Of Prisons," New York Times (August 5, 1975).

Optional Listening Assignment:

"Episode 49: Foucault On Power And Punishment," Partially Examined Life, January 11, 2012.


Week 11

Tuesday, November 15

a)  Lecture:  A Just Measure Of Pain -- The Rise Of The Penitentiary In England And North America (I)

***Angelique And The Burning Of Montreal Assignment Due***

Thursday, November 17

a)  Video:  "Demon Rum," American Experience, PBS [60 mins.]


Week 12

Tuesday, November 22

a)  Lecture:  A Just Measure Of Pain -- The Rise Of The Penitentiary In England And North America (II)

b)  Discussion:  Stanford Prison Experiment

c)  Discussion:  The History Of Kingston Penitentiary

Viewing Assignment:

"Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Study, BBC (50 minutes).

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Kingston Penitentiary Discussion Topic.

Browse extensively in Stanford Prison Experiment Discussion Topic.

Optional Viewing Assignment:

Tales From Kingston Pen, Doc Zone, CBC, December 2012.

Thursday, November 24

a)  Discussion:  On The Farm: Robert William Pickton And The Tragic Story Of Vancouver's Missing Women

Reading Assignment:

Stevie Cameron, On The Farm: Robert William Pickton and the Tragic Story of Vancouver's Missing Women (Toronto: Alfred A. Knopf, 2010).


Week 13

Tuesday, November 29

a)  Lecture: The Mounties In History And Myth

Thursday, December 1

a)  Lecture: Rites Of Execution: Capital Punishment In American History

Optional Viewing Assignment (I recommend watching at least one episode from this three-hour documentary series)

"The New Taste For Blood," Episode 1, A Very British Murder With Lucy Worsley, BBC Four, 2013.

  "Detection Most Ingenious," Episode 2, A Very British Murder With Lucy Worsley, BBC Four, 2013.

"The Golden Age," Episode 3, A Very British Murder With Lucy Worsley, BBC Four, 2013.


Week 14

Tuesday, December 6

a)  Discussion: Killer Of Little Shepherds

b)  Possible Video Clip: "The Poisoner's Handbook"

Reading Assignment:

Douglas Starr,  Killer Of Little Shepherds: The Case Of The French Ripper And The Birth Of Forensic Science (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2011).

Thursday, December 8

a)  Mini-Lecture: Crime And Punishment In Canadian History -- An Introduction

b)   Final Exam Preview


Final Exam DateTuesday, December 13, 1:00 PM, Tyee 113


Texts

Davis, Natalie Zemon.  Return Of Martin Guerre.  Cambridge: Harvard, 1984.

Hutchinson, Allan C.  Is Eating People Wrong: Great Legal Cases And How They Shaped The World.  New York: Cambridge, 2011.

Cameron, Stevie.  On The Farm: Robert William Pickton And The Tragic Story Of Vancouver's Missing Women.  Toronto: Alfred A. Knopf, 2010.

Starr, Douglas.  Killer Of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story And The Birth Of Forensic Science.  New York: Vintage, 2011.


Evaluation

Letter of Introduction

1%

Historic Trial Assignment

20%

Angelique And The Burning Of Montreal Assignment

20%

Seminar Notes

24%  (4 x 6%)

Final Exam

15%

Class Participation

20%

a)  Letter of Introduction (1%)

Who are you? Where are you from? What are your interests? Why are you taking this course? Do you have any questions, concerns, or suggestions as we start the course? Write two or three informal paragraphs for the second class of the semester to introduce yourself to me.


b)  Historic Trial Assignment (20%)

This will be a short research paper in which you place one prominent historical trial in its legal, social and cultural context.


c)  Angelique And The Burning Of Montreal Assignment (20%)

This primary research assignment asks you to critically analyze documents associated with the 1734 arson trial of the Montreal slave Marie-Joseph dite Angelique.


d)  Seminar Notes (24%) [4 x 6%]

Seminar notes are one-to-two page commentaries upon the course books .  Hand in or e-mail me your seminar notes within a week of the discussion of that particular reading.  Please send me your electronic files in .doc, ,docx or .rtf format and label your files so that I can identify both you and the reading by the file title.

The purpose of the seminar notes is to provide you with the opportunity to organize your thoughts after each of the common major readings.  This exercise is also designed to facilitate analytical group discussion on our seminar days.  The notes need not be formal in style but should be at least a couple long paragraphs in length and should highlight key themes from the reading.  Although you should write concisely, it is fine if some of your seminar notes are more than two pages in length.

Rather than being graded on a letter scale, the seminar notes will be evaluated on a check, check-plus, and check-minus basis:

Check: A fully satisfactory seminar note (7.7/10, B)

Check-Plus: A strong note that offers particularly good analysis and/or a well-developed commentary upon the text (9.2/10, A)

Check-Minus: A weak seminar note that does not successfully engage with the reading (6.2, C)

Particularly outstanding seminar notes may receive a Check-Plus-Plus (10.0/10, A+)


e)  Final Exam (15%)

The Final Exam will be designed the be approximately two hours in length and will consist of a series of mini-essay answers discussing key terms and topics from the history of crime, punishment and deviancy.


f)  Class Participation (20%)

The class participation grade will be based upon attendance; pre-class preparation; and the willingness to contribute thoughtfully to full-class and small-group discussion.  Although attendance is not required, I will take roll, and those who are not in class regularly will receive a poor grade for this component of the course.  I would like to encourage a classroom environment in which all are eager to share their ideas and in which lectures are accompanied by thoughtful dialogue.

Assigning class participation grades can be quite arbitrary.  When I assign participation grades at the end of the semester, I place each student in one of three following categories:

1)  Regular class attendance and excellent class participation.

2)  Regular class attendance and  fully satisfactory class participation.

3)  Irregular class attendance and preparation.

Those in Category 1 receive top participation grades.  Those in Category 3 receive poor participation grades.  Those in Category 2 are most likely to receive no specific participation grade but rather have the 85% total for their written work pro-rated to a 100% scale (in some cases the participation component may help a Category 2 student's final grade but in no instance will it lower the final grade).  Thus,  shy students are not penalized for class participation so long that they attend faithfully and I need only to distinguish between strong, satisfactory and weak participation rather than attempt to make fine distinctions.

A Note On Plagiarism

Everything that you hand in should be your original work unless otherwise indicated.  Violations of this policy may result in failing an assignment or the course in its entirety.  Please talk to me if you have any uncertainty  about what is permitted here.


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