HIS 215: MODERN EUROPE I


North Island College Fall 2017

Meeting Time: T - Th. 11:30 am - 12:50 pm

Meeting PlaceDIS 204

Instructor: Dan Hinman-Smith

Office:  Village G6

Office Hours:  T - Th. 1:00 - 2:00 pm (or by appointment)

Office Phone: 250-334-5000, Extension 4024

Home Phone:   250-336-0238

Web-Site: http://www.misterdann.com/

E-Mail: dan.hinmansmith@nic.bc.ca


Books

Paul Strathern, Death In Florence: The Medici, Savonarola And The Battle For The Soul Of Man (New York: Pegasus, 2016).

Neil MacGregor, Germany: Memories Of A Nation (New York: Penguin, 2016).

Dava Sobel, Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir Of Science, Faith, And Love (New York: Walker, 2011).

Ina Caro, Paris To The Past: Traveling Through French History By Train (New York: Norton, 2012).

Optional Textbook:  I have decided not to have a required textbook in HIS 215.  If you would like such a text for your own reference, possibilities include the following (each is also available in a combined volume that stretches to the contemporary era):

Mark Kishlansky, Patrick Geary and Patricia O'Brien, Civilization In The West, Volume B, From 1350 To 1850 (New York: Pearson, 2007).

Donald Kagan, Steven Ozment and Frank M. Turner, Western Heritage, Volume B, 1300-1815 (New York: Pearson, 2009).

C.F. Black, et al., Cultural Atlas of the Renaissance (New York: Prentice Hall, 1993) offers a good introduction to the Renaissance.


Course Description

History 215 is offered as an introduction to the most significant trends in European history from the late Medieval era to the French Revolution.  It is not meant to be a comprehensive survey in which you are taught "all you need to know" but is designed to highlight several important issues loosely organized within a chronological framework.  We will be dealing with broad themes: the growth of commercial capitalism; the rise of the nation state; the impact of such intellectual movements as the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment; and the expansion of European power, commerce, and culture to the Americas, Asia, and Africa.  But we will also try to bring history back down to the personal level.  How did people create meaning in their own lives?  How did they shape their world, and how, in turn, were they shaped by events, by social structure, and by other people?  We will approach such questions through a mixture of lecture presentation, class discussion, reading, student research, slide shows, and video.


Tentative Class Schedule

Week 1

Thursday, September 7

a)  Course Introduction

b)  Video: "Medici: Godfathers Of The Renaissance" (PBS, 2003) [220 mins.]


Week 2

Tuesday, September 12

a)  Discussion: Age Of Discovery -- The Renaissance And Our Disruptive Age

b)  Continue Video: "Medici: Godfathers Of The Renaissance" (PBS, 2003)

Listening Assignment:

  "What The Renaissance Can Teach Us About Trump And Our Disruptive Age," Current, CBC, September 6, 2016.

"What The Renaissance Can Teach Us About Our Disruptive Age, Part 2," Current, CBC, September 7, 2016.

Optional Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Age Of Discovery Discussion Topic

Thursday, September 14

a)  Lecture: Europe 1492

Viewing Assignment:

  "Reconquest," Episode 2, Blood And Gold: The Making Of Spain, BBC, 2015.


Week 3

Tuesday, September 19

a)  Discussion: Machiavelli

b)  Lecture:  The Italian Renaissance (1)

Viewing Assignment:

  "Who's Afraid Of Machiavelli?," Imagine, BBC, 2013.

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Machiavelli's The Prince Discussion Topic

Mini-Exercise:

Complete the How Machiavellian Are You Quiz

Thursday, September 21 

a)  Lecture: The Italian Renaissance (2)

Viewing Assignment:

  "Travels With Vasari, Part 1," BBC, 2008:  Andrew Graham-Dixon's marvelous encounter with the Lives of the Artists.

"Travels With Vasari, Part 2," BBC, 2008.

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Venice Ghetto At 500 Discussion Topic


Week 4 

Tuesday, September 26

a)  Discussion: Death In Florence

b)  Discussion: Andrew Graham-Dixon And European History Through Art

Reading Assignment:

Paul Strathern, Death In Florence: The Medici, Savonarola And The Battle For The Soul Of Man

Viewing Assignment:

Watch at least one hour or more from at least one of the following Andrew Graham-Dixon series

Thursday, September 28

a)  Video: Episode from Michael Wood's Conquistadors Series, PBS (2000) [60 mins.]


Week 5

Tuesday, October 3

a)  Lecture:  "The Egg That Luther Hatched": The Reformation (1)

Viewing Assignment:

  "Martin Luther," PBS, 2002 (120 mins.):  Part 1; Part 2

Thursday, October 5

a)  Video: "Reformation: The Individual Before God," Episode 4, History Of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years (BBC, 2010) [60 mins.]

Viewing Assignment:

"An Introduction To The Protestant Reformation," Khan Academy, 2013:

Setting The Stage, Part 1 (8 minutes)

Martin Luther, Part 2 (11 minutes)

Varieties Of Protestantism, Part 3 (8 minutes)

The Counter-Reformation, Part 4 (10 minutes)


Week 6

Tuesday, October 10

a)  Lecture:  "The Egg That Luther Hatched": The Reformation (2)

b)  Luther, Ignatius, Or Calvin?

Optional Listening Assignment:

"The Siege Of Munster," In Our Time, BBC Radio 4, November 5, 2009 (45 minutes).

  "The Jesuits," In Our Time, BBC Radio 4, January 18, 2007 (45 minutes).

Thursday, October 12

a)  Discussion: Germany -- Memories Of A Nation

Reading Assignment:

Neil MacGregor, Germany -- Memories Of A Nation


Week 7

Tuesday, October 17

a)  Discussion: Early Modern Spain In The News

b)  Lecture: "One Monarch, One Empire, One Sword": Spain's Golden Age

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Early Modern Spain In The News

Listening Assignment:

  "From Tolerance To Tyranny," Ideas, CBC, February 20, 2017 (54 minutes).

Thursday, October 19

a)  Lecture: The Wars Of Religions In Europe, 1555-1648

Listening Assignment:

  "A Peasant Vs. The Inquisition: Cheese, Worms And The Birth Of Micro-History," Ideas, CBC, March 21, 2017 (54 minutes).

  "The Thirty Years War," Episode 1, The Invention Of Germany, BBC Radio 4, August 17, 2015 (28 minutes).

***First-Half Journal Due


Week 8

Tuesday, October 24

a)  Introduce Faces Assignment

b)  Lecture: Tudor And Stuart England

Optional Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Shakespeare At 400 Discussion Topic

Optional Viewing Assignment:

    "Shakespeare's Mother: The Secret Life Of A Tudor Woman," BBC Four, 2015 (59 minutes).

Thursday, October 26

a)  Lecture: The World Turned Upside Down -- The English Civil War

Viewing Assignment:

  "Roundhead Or Cavalier -- Which One Are You?," BBC Four, 20125 (58 minutes).


Week 9 

Tuesday, October 31

a)  Video: "Galileo's Battle For The Heavens" (NOVA, PBS, 2002, 120 minutes)

Thursday, November 2

a)  Discussion: Galileo's Daughter

b)  Discussion: Copernicus' Heavenly Spheres

c)  Video: "Galileo's Battle For The Heavens" (NOVA, PBS, 2002, 120 minutes)

Reading Assignment:

Dava Sobel, Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir Of Science, Faith, And Love

Optional Listening Assignment:

  "Stargazing: Copernicus' Heavenly Spheres," Compass, BBC World Service, August 27, 2017 (27 minutes).

Optional Reading Assignment:

Adam Gopnik, "Moon Man: What Galileo Saw," New Yorker (February 11, 2013).


Week 10

Tuesday, November 7

a)  Discussion:  Reformation At 400

b)  Lecture: The Measure Of All Things -- The Scientific Revolution

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Reformation At 400 Discussion Topic

Thursday, November 9

a)  Discussion: The Shadow Of The Sun King

b)  Of Sun Kings And Enlightenment (1)

Optional Viewing Assignment:

  "Dream Of A King," Episode 1, Rise And Fall Of Versailles, 2014 (52 minutes).

Optional Listening Assignment:

  "Shadow Of The Sun King, Episode 1," BBC Radio 4, June 3, 2015 (28 minutes).

"Shadow Of The Sun King, Episode 2," BBC Radio 4, June 10, 2015 (28 minutes).


Week 11

Tuesday, November 14

a)  Lecture: Of Sun Kings And Enlightenment (2)

Reading Assignment:

Robert Darnton, "Workers Revolt: The Great Cat Massacre Of The Rue Saint-Severin" (1984).

Optional Viewing Assignment:

  "Power Of Knowledge," Episode 1, Heroes Of The Enlightenment, BBC Worldwide, 2011 (52 minutes).

"Changing Society," Episode 2, Heroes Of The Enlightenment, BBC Worldwide, 2011 (52 minutes).

Optional Listening Assignment:

  "The Encyclopedie," In Our Time, BBC Radio 4, October 26, 2006 (45 minutes).

Thursday, November 16

a)  Lecture:  The Rise Of Russia From Ivan The Terrible To Catherine The Great (1547-1796) or Video: "Wrath Of The Tsar: Peter The Great" (National Geographic, 2007, 88 minutes)

Reading Assignment:

Tim Marshall, "Russia And The Curse Of Geography," Atlantic (October 31, 2015).

Optional Viewing Assignment:

  "Reinventing Russia," Episode 1, Lucy Worsley's Empire Of The Tsars, BBC Four, 2016 (59 minutes).


Week 12

Tuesday, November 21

a)  Discussion: Paris To The Past

Reading Assignment:

Ina Caro, Paris To The Past: Traveling Through French History By Train

Thursday, November 23

a)  Introduce Final Exam

b)  Lecture: Britain And Empire or Lecture:  The Rise Of Russia From Ivan The Terrible To Catherine The Great (1547-1796)


Week 13

Tuesday, November 28

a)  Lecture: "It Was The Best Of Times, It Was The Worst Of Times": The French Revolution (1)

Optional Viewing Assignment:

"French Revolution," History Channel, 2005 (90 minutes).

"*Faces Assignment Due

Thursday, November 30

a)  Discussion:  What Was Revolutionary About The French Revolution?

b)  Lecture: "It Was The Best Of Times, It Was The Worst Of Times": The French Revolution (2)

Reading Assignment:

Robert Darnton, "What Was Revolutionary About The French Revolution?," New York Review Of Books (January 19, 1989).

Viewing Assignment:

  "The French Revolution: Tearing Up History," BBC Four, 2014 (59 minutes).

Optional Listening Assignment:

  "Maximilien Robespierre," Episode 2, The Invention Of France, BBC Radio 4, November 9, 2015 (28 minutes).


Week 14 

Tuesday, December 5

a)  Video:  "David's 'Marat,'" (Simon Schama's Power Of Art, BBC, 2006, 52 minutes)

Thursday, December 7

a)  Discussion:  Symbols Of The French Revolution

b)   Course Wrap-up

Reading Assignment:

Browse extensively in Symbols Of The French Revolution Discussion Topic


Second-Half Journal Due Thursday, December 14


Evaluation

First-Half  Journal 

25%

Second-Half  Journal 

25%

Faces Assignment 20%

Final Exam

15%

Class Participation

15%


a)  Journal (50%)

The student journal is the main assignment in this class.  The purpose of the journal is to provide you the opportunity for frequent thoughtful, analytical and personal commentary upon course-related material.  The advantages of the journal, to my mind, are that it breaks work down into regular and manageable chunks, and that in enables you to seize hold of the curriculum in a way which reflects your own interests and style.

The journal will be graded in two installments.  It will be due at the mid-point of the semester.  This installment will count for 25% of the course grade.  The journal will then again be due at the end of the semester.  This installment will also contribute 25% towards the course grade.

In order to give you a basic structure and to clearly communicate my expectations, I will specify certain mandated entries and suggest a format for some responses.  However, while it is required that all work in the journal be your own original writing, you are encouraged to be imaginative in your own investigation and analysis of the core curriculum and of Early Modern European History more generally.  Part of the logic of the journal is that it provides you with some space to pursue topics of particular interest.

The embedded tension within the assignment between structure and flexibility is deliberate.  The entries will, no doubt, vary in format, length, and quality.  Do not hesitate to take risks and to express your own opinion.  It's fine if some entries read more like summary than analysis; it can be helpful to put what you have learned from an article or a video into your own words.  This is an assignment designed to encourage and to reward extensive student effort and learning.  My expectation is that a good-faith approach to the course will lead to success.

I recommend that each Journal installment be at least 12 double-spaces in length and include a minimum of six entries.


b)  Faces Assignment (20%)

This assignment will ask you to research assorted significant figures from world history and then to portray each through in over-sized bubblegum card biographical format.


c)  Final Exam (15%)

The final exam will ask you to write a small series of mini-essays that analytically compare and contrast related historical figures and terms.


d)  Class Participation (15%)

The class participation grade will be based upon attendance; pre-class preparation; and the willingness to contribute thoughtfully to full-class and small-group discussion.  Although attendance is not required, I will take roll, and those who are not in class regularly will receive a poor grade for this component of the course.  I would like to encourage a classroom environment in which all are eager to share their ideas and in which lectures are accompanied by thoughtful dialogue.

Assigning class participation grades can be quite arbitrary.  When I assign participation grades at the end of the semester, I place each student in one of three following categories:

1)  Regular class attendance and excellent class participation.

2)  Regular class attendance and  fully satisfactory class participation.

3)  Irregular class attendance and preparation.

Those in Category 1 receive top participation grades.  Those in Category 3 receive poor participation grades.  Those in Category 2 are most likely to receive no specific participation grade but rather have the 90% total for their written work pro-rated to a 100% scale (in some cases the participation component may help a Category 2 student's final grade but in no instance will it lower the final grade).  Thus,  shy students are not penalized for class participation so long that they attend faithfully and I need only to distinguish between strong, satisfactory and weak participation rather than attempt to make fine distinctions.


A Note On Plagiarism

Everything that you hand in should be your original work unless otherwise indicated.  Violations of this policy may result in failing an assignment or the course in its entirety.  Please talk to me if you have any uncertainty  about what is permitted here.


Welcome To The Course

 

 

free
web stats