DISCUSSION TOPIC: THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE


PROCEDURE:  Browse extensively in the Armenian Genocide In The News Archive listed below, and then complement that with some browsing in the Web-Site and Audio/Video Archives

Armenian Genocide In The News Archive

Armenian Genocide Web-Sites And Articles Archives

Armenian Genocide Audio And Video Archive


SOME POSSIBLE QUESTIONS:

How does the case study of Armenia add most significantly to an analysis of genocide and historical memory?

Identify the following and the role each plays in issues associated with Armenia and World War I memory:  April 24, Medz Yeghern, Tsitsenakaberd, Armenian Nationhood, Armenian Diaspora, Hrant Dink, Orhan Pamuk, Article 301, Kemal Ataturk, Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

How would you begin to explain the Turkish official position, given that so much of the Republic seemed premised upon the conscious rejection of the Ottoman past?  That is, why would the actions of the Ottomans be framed as an "insult to Turkishness"?

How do you react to various national legislatures recognizing the events of 1915 as genocide?  What has been the story of Canada in this regards?

How does the issue of Armenian genocide fit into contemporary European politics?  EU membership?  The question of whether the EU is a "Christian club?"

What else is most interesting about the ways in which Armenia and World War I memory has influenced Turkish relations with other nations and intersected with contemporary geopolitics?

How would you compare and contrast the controversies associated with the recognition of the Armenian genocide with Holocaust denial?  How do you respond to the conversation surrounding possible legislation prohibiting denial?

What is the UN definition of "genocide"?  How would you assess this definition?  How useful is the term genocide, as opposed to other instances of mass killing, and how appropriate is it to a) compare and contrast instances of genocide, or b) attempt to frame these within the context of collective memory studies?

What do the words "Never Again" mean in a world of recurrent genocide?  Is it appropriate to devote significant energies to the memorialization and analysis of past genocides when those efforts might instead be directed at preventing current atrocities?


 

free
web stats